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bga_423732 - DANUBIAN CELTS - IMITATIONS OF THE TETRADRACHMS OF ALEXANDER III AND HIS SUCCESSORS Tétradrachme, imitation du type de Philippe III

DANUBIAN CELTS - IMITATIONS OF THE TETRADRACHMS OF ALEXANDER III AND HIS SUCCESSORS Tétradrachme, imitation du type de Philippe III AU
750.00 €(Approx. 825.00$ | 660.00£)
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Type : Tétradrachme, imitation du type de Philippe III
Date: c. IIe siècle AC.
Metal : silver
Diameter : 30,5 mm
Orientation dies : 11 h.
Weight : 16,63 g.
Rarity : R2
Coments on the condition:
Superbe exemplaire sur un flan large avec une frappe vigoureuse set une très belle patine de médaillier
Catalogue references :
Predigree :
Cet exemplaire provient de la collection J. G. (1933-2015)

Obverse


Obverse legend : ANÉPIGRAPHE.
Obverse description : Tête d’Héraklès à droite avec une belle léonté.

Reverse


Reverse legend : LÉGENDE ILLISIBLE.
Reverse description : Zeus assis à gauche, tenant un aigle de la main droite et un sceptre long de la main gauche ; monogramme dans le champ à gauche et sous le trône.

Commentary


Ce tétradrachme est parmi les premières imitations des Celtes de l’Est ; le droit sera rapidement stylisé et dégénéré jusqu’à présenter une masse informe.

Historical background


CELTIC DANUBE - IMITATIONS tetradrachms ALEXANDER III AND ITS SUCCESSORS

(Second - first century BC)

Under this heading are generally grouped all mints that do not have precise attribution. Sometimes the term "Celts of the East" is proposed. After the Celts have plundered Delphi and are widespread in Greece and Asia Minor, they seized a large quantity of booty, with their plunder. Hellenistic kings Diadoques Epigoni or used them as mercenaries in armies where the average wage was normally a gold stater corresponding to five penthouses tetradrachmas or twenty Attic drachmas. Prototypes representing the head of Herakles with Zeus sitting on the back were widely copied and imitated throughout Pontus, northern Macedonia and Thrace. The final phase of counterfeiting occurs at the end of the second century or early first century BC where there are still traits of law and reverse legends and more than a rounded side of a room substantially smooth on both sides.

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